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on the civil rights agenda with access to the white house and for congress, all of that was contingent not taking a stand on vietnam. >> host: he was very upset on the stands he took because he felt weak handled civil rights and voting rights over and now you are going to go against me as i am up for the reelection you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: now will understand what courage it took to take the stand she did, and i understand more about why she hesitated coretta didn't hesitate. she was involved in the entire war movement but she wasn't a public figure so she could send her to a centrally speak for him. >> host: and again history proves dr. king right. >> guest: this is one of the ways in which i think that he is a visionary. i think that he understood the connection between the anticolonial movements that were going on around the world, and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing that we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anticolonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the a
his journey from teenage civil rights act to this present at the 1963 march on washington to editor of the attacking juniors papers. he includes encounters many leaders and organizers in the civil rights movement including ella baker, stokely carmichael and the king family. it's about an hour. >> thanks for joining man out her words. >> your boat, "martin's dream" is then no more an history book. in the book you talk about your personal journey and your very candid about your life. you also cover new insight as an historian to the life and legacy of dr. mart luther king junior. what prompted you to read the book this way? >> i wanted to write some thing to mark its 50th anniversary in business 50 years of my life, of king's legacy and his life coincided with my coming of age. so part of it was to do those two tasks. i felt i had connect it to the king legacy and yet i felt there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me and how i got involved in this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> well, it's an excellent read. you an
of the modern state of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans tender civil rights movement. stone wall is the stonewall is really the way this movement kicked off. host: richard, connecticut, independent line. caller: i do not understand why you don't have someone from the opposition to this gentleman on the show, because it is is somewhat controversial subject and you have one view. that is very obvious to anyone watching the show. a second point is that, internationally, people like this gentleman who have support in the united states -- in many countries against the nets is, if you got now, ukraine, russia, hungary, dozens and dozens of nations are looking at the united states as an evil mention because tunnel men like this person -- gentleman like this person, " have lots of money and have more money than average americans, are going into these nations and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. in russia, they had a riot and had to shut down our professed homosexual demonstration in -- shut down a pro-homosexual demonstration because, was funded b -- was funded by american groups. and
did lose. but for king he interested everything he accomplished with civil-rights was the white house and congress was contingent on not taking a stand with vietnam. >> host: president johnson was very upset with dr. king he felt that we have handed civil rights and voting rights over now you go against me that imf for reelection on the vietnam war? >> guest: now eyes understood what courage it took to take a stand that he did and why he hesitated. coretta did not. she was very involved earlier but she was not the public figure. he could send her to speak with him. >> host: and then proved him right. >> guest: this is the way that he is a visionary. with the anti-colonial movement around the world and have a cold war prevented us to show us we were on the wrong side because because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many wanted to have the system of the soviet union they were for it but we were opposed. >> host: you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: for me looking back it was not that difficult of a choice. i knew i would not go in
it not change with things like civil rights things like gay rights. what is it about this issue? >> reporter: well, one of the hard things since it's legalized, most people especially younger women have come to expect this is their right, they have the right to this care. we're not out there demanding something new but we're encouraging to keep the right we already have. so it's not quite the same for a struggle in guy rights or something new. for this generation it's maintain what we already have so you're not going to see as much enthusiasm. now people are seeing what can happen if you take for grants the right to have access to an abortion care and people are starting to push back. i'm optimistic about how we feel about this going forward. >> michael: that's a great answer to the question. that's exactly right. it's keeping it right rather than trying to get a new right. that makes a difference. it's also a big difference to keep news coverage of this alive all the time. thank you kate sheppard from mother jones magazine for coming on "the war room"." we have a progressive from a red stat
the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal then surely the love we dmoyt one another must be equal as well. >>reporter: president insisting we address climate change and immigration arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled from our country there. were powerful performances. kelly clarkson stirring rendition of my country 'tis of thee. ♪ [ singing]. >>reporter: beyonce returning 4 years later this time to sing the national anthem. ♪ the rockets♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof ♪ through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ . >>reporter: as the president made his exit up those steps, a pause. turning around to take in his final inaugural moment one more time. microphone picking up what he said. >> about first couple made their way back to the white house, they emerge from the motorcade as they did 4 years ago. crowds cheering return home. first family taking in a parade. first couple with the kiss. the president moving to the
rights and the -- religion and civil rights and they are the only state that doesn't allow gay marriage. >>> it is just a big hole in the ground now, why many say the miracle on jones street will happen again even bigger and better. >> our next question from john from baltimore. >> a priceless moment during a radio interview with jim harbaugh's mother, a surprise guest and you will hear the question that pretty much stole the show. look at you guys with your fancy-schmancy u-verse high speed internet. you know, in my day you couldn't just start streaming six ways to sunday. you'd get knocked off. and sometimes, it took a minute to download a song. that's sixty seconds, for crying out loud. we know how long a minute is! sitting, waiting for an album to download. i still have back problems. you're only 14 and a half. he doesn't have back problems. you kids have got it too good if you ask me. [ male announcer ] now u-verse high speed internet has more speed options, reliability and ways to connect. rethink possible. >>> they call it sacred ground, serving free meals to millions of people,
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
. [laughter] >> i was lucky enough to be there for all of them. >> the president spoke about selma, civil rights, seneca falls, stonewalled, where the modern gay rights movement was born. the couple of things happen. congress will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch monnell of reaching an agreement on the filibuster, nothing profound, but that they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact the presidency? >> what the house did is a sign of what is ahead of us. they have not gone over the defeat from november. they have no leverage. they disvered theyave e leverage and now have to wait to back down. this is a face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. the president is in a much stronger position in dealing with the republicans in the house. >> do you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion, but the president, like any reelected president, essentially, absent a national event where he becomes a dramatic figure, watches his popularity be rationed out day- by-day. he is strong now. it is hard to believe that he will be as stron
of civil rights, selma, and stonewall, manhattan bossuet's the village where the modern gay rights movement was born. a couple of things happened in congress this week that may have an impact -- will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch mcconnell reaching an agreement on the filibuster. nothing profound. also, they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact president? >> what the house did it is illustrative of what will be ahead of us. they have not gotten over the defeat from november 6. we are going to tie everything to the debt ceiling, this budget crisis. they have no leverage over the president. they discover they have no leverage. now they have to find a way to back down. this is their face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. you will see more of this. the president is in a much stronger position of dealing with the congress and house republicans. >> you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion. but i dissent, the president, like any other, absent a national event where he becomes the dominant central dramatic figure, w
to the left. >> as a civil rights issue of. >> that's right. he talked about global climate change and how we will attack that. immigration reform. by the way, there is jay-z and beyonce. >> by the way, she looks fantastic. >> moving on quickly. she is an incredibly beautiful woman. megyn: i defended him when he said it as well. [laughter] [talking over each other] >> i was just saying that i think both of you have points well taken. pillars in the eyes of the democrats and liberals of the american social progress in american society. he was also advancing some items which were not well established one can say he's the president, he got elected, he's got a mandate. but he wasn't saying that he was going to meet republican pathway. >> the president and the vice president with the official signing. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> thank you very much. [applause] megyn: we received about a dozen e-mails from our folks and viewers elaborating on what the crypt area is. it is called that because george washington was supposed to be buried there. but he was not because his fa
. that he also spoke up boldly for equality, human rights, civil rights for all americans. i remember he said, and you may recall, too, mr. speaker, he said, he said, we will never forget, you know, stonewall, cynical falls and selma. these are three iconic moments in civil rights history when he talked about the women's right movement, gay rights movement and african-american movements for civilritis. but they ale added up to one thing which is that an american is an american is an american, doesn't matter what your color is, what your sex is, who you love and want to be with, what matters are that you are an american and entitled to the full protection of the law in these united states. i think it was very important for him to do so. it represented an evolutionary moment in american mystery that a president, being nag rated into his second term, -- being inaugurated into his second term, would stand up and say civil and human rights for all people. i thought it was a great moment and found myself cheering even though i hadn't planned on doing so. but he didn't stop there. he specifical
. it is the right thing to do. in my view, this is a human rights issue of our times. like the civil rights issues of the 1960's. like the women's rights issues before it. it is of a fair and right thing to do is to pass comprehensive immigration reform, that provides a pathway to citizenship for individuals who are here, while also helping young people who were brought here at no fault of their own to be able to complete high school, going to college, serve in the military, and know that they can live and our country without fear of deportation. known as the dream act. and so, those are things that are very important to me. i know you said you are from texas. it is a very important issue. i will be serving on the homeland security committee and that committee has partial jurisdiction over immigration issues, particularly those pertaining to border security, ice, and customs, so we look forward to tackling that an upcoming session. host: representing nevada's fourth district as a democrat. tell us about the district it encompasses. guest: the nevada fourth district is the newest seat that we learn
that are criticizing the president, it is civil rights rhetoric. they are the same republicans that would be criticizing jfk for dividing the republican ares back in the 1960s when they were trying to pass voting rights. >> they were democrats. >> there is one big challenge. reagan had reagan democrats and there is almost non existent in this country right now. and i think the way that he went through this address in a confrontational way sets up barriers for him. that was something that reagan was fantastic about. right now, obama has fractured capitol hill that not much is getting done. that is the challenge. >> we have to get out of here. he says the shrinking few do well while the growing group have trouble making it. and it isn't cleverly disguised. he won i get that. ramesh, thank you very much kevin and mark. top golfer complaining that he has a personal tax rate of 62%. because of the tax hike enacted in his home state of california. of course he is right on track. we have the answers next up. would define you as an innovator. to hold more than one patent of this caliber... would
in your "usa today" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil libert
stonewall, along with selma, put it with the civil rights movement and a gay bar raided by police. this says a lot about where his values are right now on this issue. and it speaks volumes about where the country's moved. >> he also mentioned women's equality as well, women's rights. what is wrong with an america, a modern america taking a basic standpoint that all men and women should be equal, whether it's the amount they're paid for the same job, their sexuality, the color of their skin. i like the way the president brought it all together and said, you know something? actually, equality should mean that -- equality. >> he did sort of say that, but the one word he never said yesterday, piers, was gun or guns and we ought to put that on the record. there's a great reason he didn't say that, i guess the same reason he never bothered to revive the assault weapons ban -- >> i'm talking about guns all night, as you know. >> talking about president obama in his second term. let's be fair about his first term. >> do you have any exception to him wanting to apparently categorize as joe biden who
next guest, henry marsh at the forefront of the civil rights battle. he handled more than 50 school desegregation cases and innovated strategies to battle employment discrimination, which is what makes the action of his conservative colleagues in the general assembly worthy of condemnation. when mr. marsh went to washington, d.c. last week on martin luther king day to witness president obama's second inauguration, republicans in the state senate used his absence to gerrymander the commonwealth map. joining me from richmond is virginia state senator, henry marsh. nice to have you mr. marsh. >> good morning. >> first i want to say thank you for joining us. i understand how had to go to the early services at church this morning to make time to be here. i greatly appreciate that. >> i didn't want to miss church. the lord made all this happen. >> in fact, let me ask you in part about how angry you are about how your absence has made possible this new map. >> actually, i'm ashamed and embarrassed for my state. somebody's absent almost two or three days a week. never was there an attempt t
" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this grewat this-- -- great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil liberties movem
that really moved justice. lyndon johnson would say maybe that saw like he admitted the first civil rights law was really bad but he said the important thing was to pass it. once you pass it, it's easy to go back and fix it. and i think that if i look back on his first term, i think of two things. one was the healthcare and foreign paul is a maybe because i'm writing right now about a president bringing a country into a war it didn't need. i think in a way president obama is winding down wars. >> rose: that's one of the things in the atmosphere about him. jon meacham, three presidents that you know well now, andrew jackson, thomas jefferson and george bush 41. how do you assess the first term of barack obama. >> i think if president obama had somehow lost in november, he would have a very strong historical hand to play. because the prevention of more economic disaster in 2009 is something that is not fully appreciated in real time by people who are suffering, historian like that kind of thing. you could have an assessment of how he had done and he had done pretty well in doing that. and i thi
couldn't happen. civil rights, womens rights, don't ask don't tell, sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> this will not work or make a difference. >> what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys that commit crimes. >> a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house to wish the obama administration success in passing tighter gun control laws. >> tens of thousands of protestors took to the streets of san francisco for the anniversary of legalizing abortion. pro-life protestors marched down market street from the civic center to justin herman plaza demanding roe v wade be turned over. a law student who testified before congress about contraception was a guest speaker. >> there is a more profound sight about access. about affordability and insurance coverage and making sure people especially in rural areas have access. >> i would like to see everyone question abortion more. they say it should be legal and safe they don't talk about rare. >> as many as 40,000 people attended the pro-life rally. it's the biggest a
. and then the third element was his expansion of civil rights where he talked about immigrants and gays and even shoehorned gun rights under the rubric of the security. he outlined the liberal agenda, the big-government agenda of the future. >>gretchen: i think there were two words that came out of it that summarized what charles was saying was that the president yesterday used these two words: collective action. if you parse those two words, it could bring you back to how he started in his career as a community organizer. >>steve: bob schieffer from cbs said there were no memorable lines in this speech. i think what is memorable is what his political director at cbs said in offering advice in a "slate" magazine column to the president. go for the throat of the g.o.p. listen. >> this article should scare anybody who has any doubts whatsoever about the media's impartiality. he is the news director, political director -- excuse me -- for cbs news. he writes a piece in which he calls for essentially an antidemocratic action. depoliticize the g.o.p. action. he believes obama at to delegitimize. it
the officers of justicc is now probing f -3 &pwhether an derson's civil rights were violated during the incident. 0731 i fell bad, it's not right...oc::i stood there and watched them kill my chiid 0744 0744 the ooficers involved remain suspended with paa. they 3till faceean internal affairs 3 a parkville waterrmain reak leaves 80 omes without wattr. a viewee sent us thii photo of aaer shooting early fifty feet into the air aa thee site of the break at 8300 tapu court. the geyser forced it's way through the asphalt to create a very unwelcomed fountain. the department of puulic wwrks shut the water offfand ot the geyser under control. they're working on ressoring service t thosse80 homes. social media presents new coocerns or those wwo but now lawmakeer in nebraska are working on a legislationnovvr who ontrols legislation woull allow a new - someone's state be pprmitted to terminate their lovee one's online account. "last year, an individuall plient of mine n her early 60s passed away. she was who guessed correctly at her facebook account passworddand - her wall that
nominated an anti-civil rights candidate in 1964 barry goldwater, and since then has not cracked 20% with the black vote. i'm wondering if just now finally after all these years maybe getting on board with an immigration reform policy do you think that gets you anywhere where you are right now with the latino vote or did that ship sail? >> you know i hope that it does. i'd have to tell you, actions -- i think people are waiting to see what we do. and my hope is that we are going to meet the expectations that people have of us. that this is a problem that we will solve. the american people are interested in solutions. they are just -- they're so tired and as am i of this kicking the can down the road and not having adult conversations if you will about some of these issues whether it's immigration, whether it is the out of control federal spending, whether it is the escalating rate of debt in this country. whether it is the fact that we have a health care system that is going to have to have some attention. and the immigration issue will become linked to the
of repression and limitation of civil rights guaranteed by the constitution of the russian federation. >> several russian cities have already passed similar local laws. the move to legislate on the federal level enjoys popular support. surveys showed 2/3 of the russian public find homosexuality morally unacceptable. the bill has been criticized by human-rights groups, including the kremlin's human rights council. bbc news in moscow. >> stocks rose today as the euro hit an 11-month high. investors took heart that europe's financial crisis may have eased. it is ironic as the situation improves, the real economic situation for many europeans its worst -- gets worse. the british economy shrunk more than expected. the belgian economy is just as bleak. throughout northern and southern europe the fear is losing your job. >> the fire has been burning for three months fell, who arming the striking workers. they are the latest victims of europe's economic crisis. say goodbye to the sprawling ford factory in eastern belgium. it is shutting down. with europe in recession, they are not selling eno
an awful lot and passionately, and rightfully so, about rights, about civil rights. he didn't talk at all about civic responsibilities. and the thing i remember best about kennedy's speech is ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country. that's one of the things really missing in our country now and it's gone away over the last 15 years. we're trying to have democracy without citizenship. >> also had a chance to talk vermont senator bernie sanders at the american legions inaugural ball. he's the longest-serving independent in congressional history. he's also chair of the senate veterans affairs committee and he's talking about how concerned he is there are cuts to social program will hurt the military and families. i asked how does he plan to work with republicans to bring him closer to his side. >> i think republicans will be getting -- are beginning to catch on. they're beginning to understand the american people do not think that it makes sense to cut back on programs like social security, medicare, medicaid, veterans' needs and say, oh, yeah, we shoul
and -- muskee and stafford and chafee, giants in this body who stepped forward and civil rights, stepped forward on environmental issues, stepped forward on the pressing issues of the time. and so the senate once again in that time period passed laws. i remember i was a kid here in washington, my father was secretary of the interior, the wilderness law, clean water act, clean air act, we set up the environmental protection agency. i mean, these were big laws, big, bold laws that were dealing with our problem. so once again, glory days of the senate. and i -- i -- i think we have that potential as i see the new senators coming in, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too lo
well senator baker's story about how the civil rights bill in 1968 was passed. i discussed this with the republican leader before. he knows that era as well or better than i do. but there was a time when senator baker said he was in everett dirksen's office, the man who had the job senator mcconnell now has. he was the republican leader then. he said he heard the telephone ring and heard only one end of the conversation, but senator dirksen was saying, no, mr. president, i cannot come down and have a drink with you tonight. i did that last night and louella is very unhappy with me. and that was the conversation. about 30 minutes later there was a rustle out in the outer office, the office senator mcconnell holds, and two beagles came in and lyndon johnson, the president, said to the republican leader, everett, if you don't have a drink with me, i'm down here to have one with you and they disperiod for 45 -- and they disappeared for 45 minutes. the point of that is it was in that very office, the republican leader's office in 1968, the next year that the civil rights bill wa
fifteen percent or more. >>> now to a story about civil rights and soda. the naacp is fighting the ban on big sugary drinks in new york city. it is supposed to go into effect in march. now, restaurants and other venues won't be able to sell sugary drinks and cups larger than 16 ounces. all to combat new yorkers' weight problem as the mayor explained when the board of health approved the measure in september. >> nearly 60% of adult new yorkers are overweight or obese and each faces a greater risk of developing a host of diseases including type 2 diabetes, cancer, hypertension and heart disease and, of course, obesity doesn't just affect adults. among new york city kids, nearly 40% are overweight or obese. >> joining me now is hazel dukes, president of the naacp new york state conference. miss dukes, thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> listen, when we think about the great fights of the naacp, we think about civil rights, we think about voting rights, we think about desegregating schools. and now sugary drinks. your group joined with hispanic federation and filed a j
on to dave, a republican in indiana. caller: hello, c-span. you talk about rights. civil rights, gay rights, and all that. what about the rights of the unborn? don't they have any rights in this country anymore? second, if he is so wanting to come to either do what is right for the country, why does he go outside and do executive orders when he does not get his way? host: we're talking about president obama's second inaugural address. if you missed any part of it yesterday, go to our website c- span.org and watch it there. we covered it throughout the day including the speech, congressional luncheon, and the parade. all of that on c-span.org. gary on twitter says -- host: terry, republican in north carolina. caller: hello, i would like to see obama start his second term off a little bit better. i would like to hold c-span to what they were supposed to do on his first term. quit having the meetings behind closed doors but you guys are supposed to have the cameras in the room. host: we would have cameras in the room if it was allowed. caller: well, you see, that is what he promised last time.
. housing, they are discriminated against. a lot is almost a civil rights issue. it is a human rights issue. i am hoping integration helps that. families are torn apart by it. i am fortunate to have had a very fortunate family. the stress and strain economically will bust up families. you are right on it. think -- thank you for your acknowledgement. >> i think it is interesting families would not hesitate to get a family matter cannot -- family member help for appendicitis or any other problem but often have a difficult time reaching out to get the behavioral health and the substance seized disorder treatment they need. the bottom line is it is often seen that you have a character problem or a bad mom or dad or something along those lines, rather than, for many people, if they have a brain disease. there is a lot of education still to come and a lot of support we need at several levels for people to be able to move forward and raise their hand and come out and get help. i can also say we need to stick our head up and be proud of the fact that the area of health care we provide care in and w
and efferent dirksen on civil rights. that would not have happened if the government hadn't been divided and it wouldn't have been as easily accepted by the american people if it had not been divided. if this democratic president and mixture of republicans and democrats in congress say to the american people, we got a real fiscal cliff for you. all the programs that you depend on to pay your medical bills aren't going to have enough money to pay them, and we're going to have to make some changes to deal with that, people won't accept that, especially if it comes from both of us. and as far as who's supposed to propose it, well, senator corker and i proposed it. but we're not president. and we're not president. and i don't know what the governor of virginia's 1350er7bs experience was, but if i waited, we'd still be driving on dirt roads. the legislate,all 535 of us will say, no, mr. president, we couldn't possibly do it that way. let's do it ail bit different and we'll come to a result. that's the way our system works. we got three months to do it. i hope that the republican leader will c
to stonewall in such a clear and simple phrase he captured the struggle of some many of us, the civil rights challenge of so many of us. we need to engage in the conversation. host: what do you expect from the congress in this area? guest: much has happened in the congress. out efforts were mostly about blocking bad things from happening. we did that in the early 2000's. i see parallels with reducing gun violence with marriage equality and support for the gay and lesbian community. we see support from republicans for marriage equality and support from democrats. continued efforts to pass the respect for marriage act, which would get rid of the defense for marriage act. i see the courts -- the supreme court is taking up marriage equality. they will be heard in march with a decision heard in june. there has been a shift in public attitudes, just as i see a shift on reducing gun violence. host: good morning. caller: i watch the news a lot and i see the shootings and the mass shootings are committed by the mentally ill. i have a son and i see this and my son. no gun control law would control him
-- we had desegregation in the military in 1948. the civil rights act was passed in 196. equal pay for men and women in decades. something the society still can't claim to have. this is not about set asides or quotas but saying we will open the field for those who are capable of filling it in. in no way does it endanger national security if you have people who are qualified to serve in those roles. >> do you think there were opportunities you missed out on because of a policy like this and other women, the opportunities missed out on whether pro-potion motions or advancement? give us an idea how much women have been missing out on. >> a young woman came through boot camp with me and she signed up literally to fight. she was assigned to be a baker in the mess hall. she cried her eyes out for days because she wasn't going to serve on the front lines. i met every physical, emotional and mental challenge to serve on the front line but i'm 4'11" and i need an ammo box to shoot out of the fox hole. i don't belong on the front line. but the women who do meet those standards, it ought to b
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